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2017 Hurricane Names and Season Dates
Coconut palm trees in hurricane force winds.
When does hurricane season start in Florida?
The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season in FL begins on Thursday June 1st, and runs through until November 30th. The months of August and September are considered the “peak months” of the season each summer. Have your hurricane plan ready!

 

What are the 2017 hurricane names?
Below you can find the list of hurricane names that will be used during the 2017 Atlantic basing season. Names are recycled every 6 years unless they are retired.

Arlene Bret Cindy Don Emily Franklin Gert

Harvey  Irma Jose Katia Lee Maria Nate

Ophelia Philippe Rina Sean Tammy Vince Whitney

Thursday
Oct162014

Video: Hurricane Gonzalo Update From Bermuda With Hurricane Chaser Jim Edds

The Latest Video Update: 2:21PM ET - 10/17/14 -

I just received a quick video update from storm photographer Jim Edds currenty in Bermuda awaiting dangerous Hurricane Gonzalo. Gonzalo looks to impact Bermuda in the coming hours and into this evening. Jim will continue to get updates out to me as long as he has connectivity and power.

The Latest Video Update: 10:30 PM ET - 10/16/14 -

 

Chasing Major Hurricane Gonzalo In Bermuda

Earlier this evening I had the opportunity to get in a phone interview with good friend and fellow Hurricane and storm photographer Jim Edds before the power goes out. Jim is currently in Bermuda to intercept and film major Hurricane Gonzalo, and sent in this latest video of all the preparation around Bermuda before the dangerous hurricane nears the island on Friday afternoon.

More Updates from Bermuda To Come

I will have another audio and video update from Jim tomorrow hopefully just before the worst arrives and footage during the hurricane conditions.  This will be a ongoing post that gets updated over the next 24-48 hours.

Reader Comments (2)

What a Storm For Bermuda to endure! Weather Forecaster Len R. Holliday covered this Hurricane from his office location in South Carolina from start to finish! His oldest son, Matthew Holliday at the University Of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma covered the story from Bermuda in his location in Oklahoma! This Father-Son Team had forecast this Hurricane would make a direct hit on Bermuda days in advance! Len Said, "This is one forecast we both hoped by some miracle, we were wrong." The both understand the power of these Great Tropical Storms and the potential they have to become deadly and do great damage along the way! We all will be looking at all the damage today! Stay Tuned and this Father-Son Team will keep you up to date with all your weather needs! SINCERELY, LEN R. HOLLIDAY(stormyweatherservice.wordpress.com) and B. Matthew Holliday(Founder and Lead Forecaster at firsthandweather.com).
October 18, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterLen & Matthew Holliday
I chased hurricane Gonzalo but I am withholding most of my story right now for just incase if I decide to write a book about this hurricane Gonzalo story.
Anyway, I tried to make some good out of this final hurricane chasing expedition by trying to convince McDonalds restaurant of the United States to pay to send me down and to pay to send food and etc. down with me in which I can at least be the only one to distribute the food awhile I was in Bermuda.
This story is expected to be in or is already in the Bermuda Salvation Army newspaper.
I am trying to bring some good to my decades old hurricane and windstorm passion by loving to watch trees dancing in the wind with muscle.
My mother hates it when I do these storm chasing expeditions and I do understand her reason for this.
I THANK EVERYONE A LOT.
November 7, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterMichael Giovagnoni

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